Discrimination

  • June 17, 2024

    Farm Cos. To Pay $475K To End Wash. AG's Sex Assault Suit

    A pair of agricultural companies agreed to pay $470,000 to resolve Washington state's lawsuit accusing them of standing by as a supervisor sexually harassed and assaulted female employees and firing those who complained, the state attorney general announced Monday.

  • June 17, 2024

    EEOC Went Too Far With Pregnant Worker Rule, Judge Says

    The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission overstepped its authority by requiring workplace accommodations for "purely elective abortions," a Louisiana federal judge ruled Monday, handing two states and several religious groups a temporary reprieve from agency regulations implementing the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act. 

  • June 17, 2024

    6th Circ. Says Labor Law Doesn't Bar Bias Case Against GM

    The Sixth Circuit revived a Black former General Motors employee's lawsuit Monday alleging he was denied a raise, demoted and suspended because of his race and post-traumatic stress disorder, ruling a lower court was wrong to say federal labor law preempted his bias claims.

  • June 17, 2024

    Worker Wins Pile Up As Courts Tackle Arbitration Ban's Scope

    A New Jersey federal judge recently found that a federal law barring forced arbitration of workplace sexual harassment claims covers a restaurant server's case against her boss over homophobic comments, a decision experts said squares with courts' overarching worker-friendly approach to the arbitration ban.

  • June 17, 2024

    Conn. Worker Gets $144K Counsel Fee After Bias Trial Win

    The Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection must pay nearly $139,000 in attorney fees to W. Martyn Philpot Jr. after a Black employee won a federal jury verdict on racial hostility claims, including accusations that he found a noose hanging near his desk in a state office building.

  • June 17, 2024

    Texas High Court Restores Fossil Win Over Harassment Suit

    The Texas Supreme Court reinstated Fossil Group Inc.'s defeat of a former sales associate's lawsuit alleging it did nothing to curb a supervisor's lewd online comments and sexual harassment, finding the fashion company took swift action when it learned of the misconduct.

  • June 17, 2024

    Biden Admin Spotlights Anti-Muslim Bias In The Workplace

    President Joe Biden's administration highlighted a series of measures it said it has taken over the past year to combat anti-Muslim bias, including in the workplace, amid the ongoing bloodshed in the Middle East.

  • June 17, 2024

    Amazon Fired Worker For Flagging Sex Harassment, Suit Says

    A former Amazon employee who described himself as "not heterosexual" filed a suit in Illinois federal court claiming the company allowed a co-worker to use homophobic slurs and harass him, then fired him after he complained.

  • June 14, 2024

    No Associational Shield In Conn. Employment Law, Panel Says

    Connecticut's key employment practices law does not create a cause of action for discriminating against a worker because they associate with a person who has disabilities, according to a Friday opinion by the Connecticut Appellate Court.

  • June 14, 2024

    FCA Boss' N-Word Use Not Enough For Racial Bias Suit

    A Black FCA worker's allegations that his supervisor used the N-word twice and that it was written on the bathroom wall are not enough to prove he experienced a hostile work environment or was prevented from doing his job, a Michigan appeal panel has ruled.

  • June 14, 2024

    9th Circ. Revives Union Pacific Workers' Disability Bias Suits

    The Ninth Circuit on Friday reversed Union Pacific Railroad's wins in three worker disability discrimination lawsuits involving plaintiffs with color-vision concerns, saying the lower court incorrectly determined that their individual claims were time-barred after an Eighth Circuit decision decertifying a thousands-strong class in similar litigation against the company.

  • June 14, 2024

    6th Circ. Keeps Block On DOE Guidance Barring Anti-Gay Bias

    A split Sixth Circuit panel on Friday said the U.S. Department of Education can't enforce guidance interpreting Title IX to ban discrimination against LGBTQ+ students in line with the U.S. Supreme Court's Bostock decision, rejecting the federal government's argument that a group of Republican attorneys general lacks standing.

  • June 14, 2024

    DC Circ. Says 'Piggybacking' Can't Save IBM Bias Claims

    International Business Machines Corp. does not have to face claims in arbitration from two workers who said they were fired because of their age, the D.C. Circuit said Friday, finding they couldn't use a "piggybacking" rule to reinstate their untimely claims.

  • June 14, 2024

    EEOC Gets $515K Deal In Disability, Genetic Bias Suit

    The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission announced Friday that a pharmacy will pay $515,000 to resolve the agency's lawsuit accusing it of recruiting workers who have hemophilia and pressuring them to let the company take over their prescriptions.

  • June 14, 2024

    NY Bill Taking Aim At Model Worker Abuse Awaits Gov.'s Pen

    The New York State Assembly greenlighted a bill now headed for the governor's desk that creates new worker protections for models that aim to rein in industry exploitation, legislation that would build a registry of modeling agencies and require them to act as fiduciaries for their workers.

  • June 14, 2024

    Red States Look To Block ACA Trans Discrimination Rule

    A group of 15 conservative states urged a Mississippi federal court to halt recently finalized regulations clarifying gender identity-based discrimination under the Affordable Care Act from taking effect, saying the new rule strips the states of their right to oversee medical ethics.

  • June 14, 2024

    Acting NJ Banking Director Denied Title Due To Sex, Suit Says

    The former acting director of banking for the New Jersey Department of Banking and Insurance was denied the permanent role because of her gender and as retaliation for reporting pay discrepancies, according to a lawsuit filed in New Jersey state court.

  • June 14, 2024

    NJ Chief Justice Depo 'Redundant' In Pension Fight, Court Told

    The New Jersey judiciary urged the state court to deny a bid to depose Chief Justice Stuart Rabner in a suit brought by a former Superior Court judge over the denial of her disability pension application, arguing she can't meet the heightened burden required to depose a high-ranking official and that the chief justice's testimony is privileged.

  • June 14, 2024

    Red State Challenge To EEOC Pregnant Worker Rule Falls Flat

    An Arkansas federal judge on Friday rejected a bid from a group of Republican state attorneys' general to freeze the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's rule implementing the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act ahead of its June 18 effective date, refusing to issue an injunction and ruling they lacked standing to invalidate the regulations. 

  • June 14, 2024

    Former IT Worker Wants Outright Win In FMLA Suit

    A former information technology worker asked a Florida federal court Friday to reconsider a win it denied him in his lawsuit alleging he was fired after he took medical leave to treat anxiety, arguing the court should have found his company acted illegally.

  • June 14, 2024

    Update On Ex-George Mason Prof's Suits Over Sex Allegations

    After two women came forward last August accusing former BigLaw partner, FTC commissioner and George Mason University law professor Joshua D. Wright of sexual improprieties with students and direct reports, a number of additional accusations and lawsuits followed. Here are updates on the litigation and everything else surrounding the allegations.

  • June 14, 2024

    NY Forecast: Class Cert. Args In Four Seasons Layoff Suit

    This week, a New York federal judge will consider a motion to certify a class of former workers at the Four Seasons Hotel New York who claim the hotel violated federal and state law by not notifying them of furloughs and that the hotel denied them contractually required severance. Here, Law360 explores this and other cases on the docket in New York.

  • June 14, 2024

    Dunkin' Franchise Must Face Customer's Race Bias Suit

    An intermediate appellate court in Massachusetts on Friday revived part of a lawsuit brought by a Black customer of a Dunkin' franchise who says an employee deliberately ignored his order for 15 minutes, then threw his food at him and called him a racist epithet.

  • June 14, 2024

    Lockheed Worker Fired For Romantic Emails Claims Age Bias

    Lockheed Martin used romantic messages that a longtime engineer sent to a "high school sweetheart" over his company email as an excuse to get rid of him because he was 70 years old, the former worker told a California state court.

  • June 14, 2024

    Justices' Harm Edict Tops 2024's Biggest Bias Rulings So Far

    A recent watershed U.S. Supreme Court ruling eased the level of harm workers must show to bring discrimination cases, while orders from the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and a lower federal court clarified the justices' decision last year on religious accommodations. Here's a look at a quartet of rulings from the first half of this year that caught discrimination lawyers' attention.

Expert Analysis

  • Anti-DEI Complaints Filed With EEOC Carry No Legal Weight

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    Recently filed complaints against several companies' diversity, equity and inclusion programs alleging unlawful discrimination against white people do not require a response from the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, and should not stop employers from rooting out ongoing discriminatory practices, says former EEOC general counsel David Lopez.

  • How DEI Programs Are Being Challenged In Court And Beyond

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    In the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court's affirmative action decision last year declaring the consideration of race in university admissions unconstitutional, employers should keep abreast of recent litigation challenging diversity, equity and inclusion training programs, as well as legislation both supporting and opposing DEI initiatives in the workplace, say attorneys at Skadden.

  • What Minority Biz Law Ruling Could Mean For Private DEI

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    A Texas federal court’s recent decision to strike down key provisions of the Minority Business Development Act illustrates the wide-reaching effects of the U.S. Supreme Court's 2023 Students for Fair Admissions v. Harvard decision across legal contexts, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • Texas Hair Bias Ruling Does Not Give Employers A Pass

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    A Texas state court’s recent decision, holding that a school could discipline a student with locs for refusing to cut his hair, should not be interpreted by employers as a license to implement potentially discriminatory grooming policies, says Dawn Holiday at Jackson Walker.

  • Broadway Ruling Puts Discrimination Claims In The Limelight

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    A New York federal court's recent decision in Moore v. Hadestown Broadway that the employers' choice to replace a Black actor with a white actor was shielded by the First Amendment is the latest in a handful of rulings zealously protecting hiring decisions in casting, say Anthony Oncidi and Dixie Morrison at Proskauer.

  • Breaking Down California's New Workplace Violence Law

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    Ilana Morady and Patrick Joyce at Seyfarth discuss several aspects of a new California law that requires employers to create and implement workplace violence prevention plans, including who is covered and the recordkeeping and training requirements that must be in place before the law goes into effect on July 1.

  • Studying NY, NJ Case Law On Employee Social Media Rights

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    While a New Jersey state appeals court has twice determined that an employee's termination by a private employer for social media posts is not prohibited, New York has yet to take a stand on the issue — so employers' decisions on such matters still need to be assessed on a case-by-case basis, say Julie Levinson Werner and Jessica Kriegsfeld at Lowenstein Sandler.

  • Eye On Compliance: Employee Social Media Privacy In NY

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    A New York law that recently took effect restricts employers' ability to access the personal social media accounts of employees and job applicants, signifying an increasing awareness of the need to balance employers' interests with worker privacy and free speech rights, says Madjeen Garcon-Bonneau at Wilson Elser.

  • Draft Pay Equity Rule May Pose Contractor Compliance Snags

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    The Federal Acquisition Regulatory Council's recently proposed rule that would prohibit government contractors from requesting certain job applicants' salary history seems simple on the surface, but achieving compliance will be a nuanced affair for many contractors who must also adhere to state and local pay transparency laws, say attorneys at Hogan Lovells.

  • What Texas Employers Should Know After PWFA Ruling

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    After a Texas federal judge recently enjoined federal agencies from enforcing the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act against the state of Texas, all employers must still remain sensitive to local, state and federal protections for pregnant workers, and proactive in their approach to pregnancy-related accommodations, says Maritza Sanchez at Phelps Dunbar.

  • AI In Performance Management: Mitigating Employer Risk

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    Companies are increasingly turning to artificial intelligence tools in performance management, exposing organizations to significant risks, which they can manage through employee training, bias assessments, and comprehensive policies and procedures related to the new technology, say Gregory Brown and Cindy Huang at Jackson Lewis.

  • Spartan Arbitration Tactics Against Well-Funded Opponents

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    Like the ancient Spartans who held off a numerically superior Persian army at the Battle of Thermopylae, trial attorneys and clients faced with arbitration against an opponent with a bigger war chest can take a strategic approach to create a pass to victory, say Kostas Katsiris and Benjamin Argyle at Venable.

  • What 2 Years Of Ukraine-Russia Conflict Can Teach Cos.

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    A few key legal lessons for the global business community since Russia's invasion of Ukraine could help protect global commerce in times of future conflict, including how to respond to disparate trade restrictions and sanctions, navigate war-related contract disputes, and protect against heightened cybersecurity risks, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.