Wage & Hour

  • May 24, 2024

    9th Circ. Says H-2A Employers Must Pay Highest Wages

    The Ninth Circuit on Friday said the U.S. Department of Labor can't let employers pay foreign farmworkers on H-2A visas a lower wage rate, rejecting the department's argument that the matter is moot because the previous harvest season is over.

  • May 24, 2024

    Jazz Director Accuses Philly Pops, Execs Of RICO Conspiracy

    A former Philly Pops jazz director has sued the defunct orchestra group, its ex-CEO, a rival orchestra, the Kimmel Center and others in Pennsylvania federal court, claiming they conspired to monopolize the orchestral music market and lied about the organization's debt to force it to shut down while depriving him of pay.

  • May 24, 2024

    CVS Hit With PAGA Suit Alleging OT, Records Violations

    CVS Pharmacy Inc. regularly requires employees to work overtime due to understaffing and unreasonably high workloads without appropriately compensating them, and the company alters records by clocking employees out to make it seem it is complying with labor laws, according to a lawsuit filed Thursday in California state court.

  • May 24, 2024

    Ex-Employee, Furnisher Renew Settlement Bid In FLSA Suit

    A corporate office furnisher and a former employee who alleged he was fired after complaining about unpaid overtime have once again asked a Georgia federal judge to approve a settlement between them, saying they cured all issues identified by the judge when he refused to approve the deal in April.

  • May 24, 2024

    5th Circ. Again Upholds Engineers' OT Win

    A Fifth Circuit panel on Friday backed for the second time a lower court's ruling that two engineers receiving a weekly minimum salary as part of their compensation package were not overtime-exempt and sent the case back to the district court to determine damages awards.

  • May 24, 2024

    Cleaning Co. Should Pay Up In SEIU Arb. Case, Judge Says

    A cleaning company and its related entities should be required to compensate terminated workers with more than $22,000 stemming from an arbitration award, a New York federal magistrate judge recommended Friday, saying a Service Employees International Union affiliate showed the businesses were alter egos.

  • May 24, 2024

    4 Places That Are Leading The Gig Worker Pay Push

    A growing list of cities and states are setting mandatory wage floors for gig workers, who are typically classified as independent contractors and therefore not eligible for minimum wage protections. Here, Law360 explores places with minimum pay for gig workers.

  • May 24, 2024

    NY Forecast: School Pushes To Arbitrate Retaliation Case

    On Thursday, a federal judge will consider a Buffalo, New York, Catholic school's bid to compel arbitration of claims brought by a former president who says she was retaliated against after she uncovered financial and academic issues at the school.

  • May 24, 2024

    Applicants Lack Fed. Standing For Wash. Pay Range Lawsuit

    A Washington federal judge sent back to state court a lawsuit alleging an employer violated a new state requirement to include pay ranges in job advertisements, finding that a job listing without pay information does not harm job applicants enough to justify a federal lawsuit.

  • May 24, 2024

    3 Tips To Manage Summer's Tricky Child Labor Landscape

    Amid an uptick in enforcement against child labor violations, a changing landscape for state laws on youth employment and the unofficial start of summer hiring season, attorneys tell Law360 three ways employers can stay in compliance with their new and temporary young employees.

  • May 24, 2024

    Liberty University Fights Class Cert. Bid In Time Sheet Suit

    A supervisor of intramural sports at Liberty University can't prove that other workers are similar enough to support collective certification in a suit alleging the university messed with employees' time records to cap their hours at 40 per week to avoid paying overtime wages, the school told a federal judge.

  • May 24, 2024

    Medical Courier Service Settles Drivers' Overtime Suit

    A Georgia-based medical courier service accused of failing to pay its drivers their proper overtime wages has agreed to settle the case, according to an unopposed bid for settlement approval that calls the deal "approximately equal to plaintiffs' best possible day at trial."

  • May 24, 2024

    Calif. Forecast: Del Monte Workers Seek $2M Deal Approval

    In the coming week, attorneys should watch for the potential final approval of a $2 million deal in a wage and hour class action by Del Monte Foods Inc. plant workers. Here's a look at that case and other labor and employment matters on deck in California.

  • May 23, 2024

    PNC, Loan Officers Ink $12M Deal In Rest Break Suit

    PNC Bank has agreed to pay nearly $12 million to end a class action alleging the bank didn't pay mortgage loan officers for time spent on breaks and failed to issue accurate wage statements, according to a joint motion filed Wednesday in California federal court.

  • May 23, 2024

    $30M Deal Sealed In Cleaners' 15-Year-Old Wage Dispute

    A California federal judge on Thursday placed the final stamp of approval on a $30 million settlement resolving a 15-year-old class action accusing a janitorial company of misclassifying workers as independent contractors, saying the terms of the deal are favorable especially in light of continuing the long-running litigation.

  • May 23, 2024

    Novartis Settles Ex-Saleswoman's Gender Pay Bias Suit

    Pharmaceutical giant Novartis and a former sales representative have agreed to end a suit alleging she was paid over $20,000 less than a male colleague pitching the same product, according to filings in Colorado federal court.

  • May 23, 2024

    FirstKey Sanctioned For Trying To Coerce Workers In OT Suit

    A Texas federal judge sanctioned FirstKey Homes LLC for issuing coercive communications to employees in an apparent effort to steer them from joining a proposed wage and hour class action, finding Wednesday the only purpose the company had was "attempting to undermine the collective action in this case."

  • May 23, 2024

    NC Fintech Atty Sues Paymentus For Gender, Age Bias

    A former senior corporate counsel for cloud-based billing company Paymentus Corp. has slapped her former employer with a $100,000 age and gender discrimination suit in North Carolina federal court, saying she was paid less than her male colleagues and eventually fired for complaining, only to be replaced by a much younger male attorney.

  • May 23, 2024

    Conn. To Expand Paid Sick Leave To Smaller Businesses

    More employees in Connecticut will soon become eligible for paid sick leave after the state's governor gave his blessing on a bill that expands the state's time-off requirements to include smaller businesses.

  • May 23, 2024

    Calif. Panel Gives Restaurant Group's Arbitration Bid New Life

    The arbitration agreement a hospitality company gave to a former employee was not ambiguous, so a trial court must look at a wage and hour case again, a California state appeals court ruled, giving the company's arbitration bid another chance.

  • May 23, 2024

    Amazon Workers' $5.5M COVID Screening Deal Gets Initial OK

    A California federal magistrate judge on Wednesday gave her preliminary blessing to a $5.5 million settlement Amazon agreed to pay to a class of 250,000 employees who accused the digital retail behemoth of failing to pay for time spent undergoing mandatory COVID-19 screenings before their shifts.

  • May 23, 2024

    Calif. Appeals Court Brings Back Axed PAGA Case

    A California appeals court revived a worker's representative claims under the state's Private Attorneys General Act, finding a lower court's order should be revised following a 2023 state Supreme Court ruling clarifying which PAGA claims can be sent to arbitration.

  • May 23, 2024

    Business Groups Fight OT Rule Raising Salary Limits

    A group of business associations urged a Texas federal court to block a 2024 U.S. Department of Labor rule raising the minimum salary on overtime exemption for executive, administrative or professional employees, saying the rule doesn't rectify the errors from a 2017 rule that the same court enjoined.

  • May 23, 2024

    Jackson Lewis Questions Role In Wage Suit After Ch. 11

    Jackson Lewis PC attorneys were unsure if they were able to keep representing more than a dozen Pennsylvania nursing homes as an unpaid-wage case approaches a critical deadline, telling a federal court during a conference Thursday that the Bankruptcy Code suspended their service to a group of defendants who filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy earlier in May.

  • May 23, 2024

    5th Circ. Won't Fast-Track Challenge To DOL's OT Rule

    The Fifth Circuit won't speed up a Dairy Queen franchisee's challenge to the U.S. Department of Labor's decision to increase the salary threshold for a Fair Labor Standards Act overtime exemption, turning down the entity and its owner's bid to expedite the appeal.

Expert Analysis

  • History Supports 2nd Circ. View Of FAA Transport Exemption

    Author Photo

    In the circuit split over when transport workers are exempt from the Federal Arbitration Act, sparked by the 2022 U.S. Supreme Court decision in Southwest Airlines v. Saxon, the Second Circuit reached a more faithful interpretation — one supported by historical litigation and legislative context, though perhaps arrived at via the wrong route, say Joshua Wesneski and Crystal Weeks at Weil.

  • Employers Need Clarity On FLSA Joint Employer Liability

    Author Photo

    A judicial patchwork of multifactor tests to determine joint employment liability has led to unpredictable results, and only congressional action or enactment of a uniform standard to which courts will consistently defer can give employers the clarity needed to structure their relationships with workers, say attorneys at Seyfarth.

  • Calif. Independent Contractor Lessons From Grubhub Suit

    Author Photo

    California courts have been creating little in the way of clarity when it comes to the employment status of gig workers — and a recent federal court decision in Lawson v. Grubhub illustrates how status may change with the winds of litigation, offering four takeaways for businesses that rely on delivery drivers, say Esra Hudson and Marah Bragdon at Manatt.

  • Labor Collusion Loss Will Shape DOJ's Case Strategy

    Author Photo

    Following the U.S. Department of Justice’s recent loss in United States v. Manahe, tallying its trial score record to 0-3 in labor-related antitrust cases over the past year, defendants can expect that the DOJ will try to exclude defense evidence and argue for more favorable jury instructions, say attorneys at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Staffing Company Considerations Amid PAGA Uncertainty

    Author Photo

    The impending California Supreme Court decision in Adolph v. Uber is expected to affect staffing companies, specifically how the proliferation of nonindividual Private Attorneys General Act claims are handled when the individual claim is compelled to arbitration, say Sarah Kroll-Rosenbaum and Harrison Thorne at Akerman.

  • Eye On Compliance: Joint Employment

    Author Photo

    Madonna Herman at Wilson Elser breaks down the key job conditions that led to a recent National Labor Relations Board finding of joint employment, and explains the similar standard established under California case law — providing a guide for companies that want to minimize liability when relying on temporary and contract workers.

  • How Unions Could Stem Possible Wave Of Calif. PAGA Claims

    Author Photo

    Should the California Supreme Court hold in Adolph v. Uber that the nonindividual portions of Private Attorneys General Act claims survive even after individual claims go to arbitration, employers and unions could both leverage the holding in Oswald v. Murray to stifle the resurgence in representative suits, say attorneys at Greenberg Traurig.

  • Tips For Defending Employee Plaintiff Depositions

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
    Author Photo

    A plaintiff cannot win their employment case through a good deposition, but they can certainly lose it with a bad one, so an attorney should take steps to make sure the plaintiff does as little damage as possible to their claim, says Preston Satchell at LexisNexis.

  • Predictions On Salary Levels In Proposed DOL Overtime Rule

    Author Photo

    In May, the U.S. Department of Labor is expected to propose new salary thresholds for overtime exemptions for both executive, administrative and professional employees and highly compensated earners under the Fair Labor Standards Act, and based on methodologies used in recent DOL rules, it will likely increase both thresholds, says Stephen Bronars at Edgeworth.

  • Water Cooler Talk: Whistleblowing Insights From 'Dahmer'

    Author Photo

    Tracey Diamond and Evan Gibbs at Troutman Pepper chat with DS Smith's Josh Burnette about how the show "Dahmer – Monster: The Jeffrey Dahmer Story" provides an extreme example of the perils of ignoring repeat complaints — a lesson employers could apply in the whistleblower context.

  • Retail Employer Strategies For LA Fair Work Week Ordinance

    Author Photo

    The recently effective Los Angeles Fair Work Week Ordinance changes how employers in the retail trade industry approach scheduling and hiring employees, so they should consider creating new standardized forms and procedures to maintain compliance and avoid penalties, say Thomas Petrides and Charlie Wang at Vedder Price.

  • AI For Advancing Diversity In The Workplace: Friend Or Foe?

    Author Photo

    In the wake of calls for increased workplace diversity, employers are turning to artificial intelligence to automate hiring and cut costs to reach environmental, social and governance objectives, but this technology requires human oversight to minimize biases and discrimination, say Consuela Pinto and Dawn Siler-Nixon at FordHarrison.

  • Handbook Hot Topics: Attendance Policies

    Author Photo

    Employee attendance problems are among the most common reasons for disciplinary action and discharge, which is why a clear policy neatly laid out in an employee handbook is necessary to articulate expectations for workers and support an employer's position should any attendance-related disputes arise, says Kara Shea at Butler Snow.