Courts

  • Ex-Banker Tied To Murdaugh Says Juror Issue Merits Retrial

    A former banker who was convicted of helping ex-attorney and convicted murderer Alex Murdaugh steal clients' money has urged the Fourth Circuit to give him a new trial, arguing two jurors were unconstitutionally removed.

  • Suspended Pa. Atty Gives Up License After Fraud Conviction

    A Pennsylvania lawyer has given up his law license after being sentenced to serve more than two years in prison and pay more than $260,000 in restitution for tax evasion, wire fraud and mail fraud.

  • iStock-650699658.jpg

    Fla. Bar Wants Referrals On Judicial Election Conduct Banned

    The Florida Supreme Court will now consider a rule change that would make it clear that Florida Bar officials will not consider ethics complaints by judges with respect to claims of violations of rules or laws relating to judicial elections.

  • iStock-1289619390.jpg

    Jackson Walker Seeks Sanctions Over Judge Romance Suit

    Jackson Walker LLP asked a Texas federal court Monday to sanction lawyers and their "disgruntled millionaire" client for leveling racketeering allegations in a lawsuit over a former bankruptcy judge's romantic relationship with a former firm lawyer, saying the claims are "frivolous" and "conclusory."

  • Ga. Judicial Candidate Asks State High Court To Review DQ

    A woman who had been running to take the seat of the judge overseeing the Georgia election interference case has asked the state's supreme court to review a recent ruling striking her from the ballot.

  • NJ Firm's Former Exec Says Home Purchase Not Tied To Theft

    A previous McElroy Deutsch executive is fighting a claim on her house after her husband, another former firm leader, copped to stealing $1.5 million, arguing his theft began after January 2017 and therefore the firm could not show funds were used to purchase their New Jersey home in 2016.

  • Senator_Bob_Menedez_Fraud_Trial_Continues_In_New_York_-_13_May_2024_94970.jpg

    'Gamesmanship' Lecture Launches Menendez Bribery Trial

    The corruption trial of U.S. Sen. Robert Menendez started Monday with a stern admonition from U.S. District Judge Sidney Stein after the government and defense lawyers squabbled over pretrial disclosures, and a message that the jury may be in for a long haul. 

  • High Court Skips White Law Prof's Bias Suits Against HBCU

    The U.S. Supreme Court said Monday that it won't review a white former law professor's unsuccessful suits alleging she was harassed out of her job for challenging race-and-gender-based wage inequities at a historically Black university, despite her argument that the Fifth Circuit flouted precedent when it axed her complaints.

  • APTOPIX_Trump_Hush_Money_35007.jpg

    Cohen Says Trump Knew Hush Money Records Were False

    Donald Trump's former attorney Michael Cohen took the witness stand Monday in the ex-president's New York criminal case, testifying that his longtime "boss" directed him to make hush money payments to alleged paramours and that Trump later agreed to the "legal services" label for a six-figure reimbursement despite seeing paperwork that showed otherwise.

  • Justices Reject Incarcerated Man's Atty Abandonment Claim

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to hear the case of a Texas man incarcerated on death row who says his court-appointed lawyer deprived him of a fair chance at challenging his conviction in a 2005 double homicide.

  • Coverage Recap: Day 12 Of Trump's NY Hush Money Trial

    Law360 reporters are providing live updates from the Manhattan criminal courthouse as Donald Trump goes on trial for allegedly falsifying business records related to hush money payments ahead of the 2016 election. Here's a recap from Monday, day 12 of the trial.

  • Alito Warns Freedoms Of Speech, Religion Are In Danger

    U.S. Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito warned Saturday that support for freedom of speech on college campuses is "dangerously" low, and that freedom of religion is in peril nationwide.

  • Eastman Withdraws From Colo. Suit Amid Disbarment Case

    Former Donald Trump lawyer John C. Eastman withdrew as an attorney in a Colorado civil suit on Friday as the California Supreme Court is set to consider a recommendation for the attorney's disbarment.

  • SEC Asks For Win Following Ex-Apple Atty's Guilty Plea

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission moved for summary judgment Friday on insider trading claims against a former senior attorney at Apple Inc., arguing there is no need to relitigate claims since the lawyer already pled guilty to criminal charges related to a lucrative insider trading scheme.

  • Mich. Lawmakers Introduce Judicial Privacy Bill

    A group of Michigan state senators has introduced a bill that would allow judges to seal personal information about themselves and their immediate family members in government agency files, including blocking the government from disclosing the information in response to public records requests, with some narrow exceptions.

  • Cohen Urged To Stop Trashing Trump As Testimony Nears

    The Manhattan judge overseeing Donald Trump's criminal hush money trial made clear Friday that he wants star witness Michael Cohen to stop talking publicly about the charges as the former president's erstwhile attorney prepares to take the stand as soon as Monday.

  • DC Circ. Mulls Jeffrey Clark's Removal Bid In Ethics Case

    Embattled former Trump administration lawyer Jeffrey Clark brought the fight to save his law license to oral arguments before a federal appeals court on Friday, though members of the D.C. Circuit panel hearing the case said they were struggling at times to follow his attorney's arguments.

  • NJ State Police Settle Suit Over Expungements Backlog

    The New Jersey State Police agreed to speed up the processing of expungements to resolve the Office of the Public Defender's proposed class claims over a backlog of judicial orders that numbered 46,000 as of October, Attorney General Matt Platkin and Public Defender Jennifer N. Sellitti said in a joint statement Friday. 

  • Dem Lawmakers Call For 5th Circ. Judge To Exit CFPB Case

    Six Democratic lawmakers sent a letter admonishing the Judicial Conference, saying Friday it was "undermining the integrity of the judiciary" by allowing a Fifth Circuit judge to participate in a matter in which he has a significant conflict of interest.

  • scotus 3.jpg

    The Supreme Court's Week: By The Numbers

    The U.S. Supreme Court issued two split rulings this week, one concerning copyright infringement and one over property forfeitures, but the justices still have a slew of decisions waiting to be made. Here, Law360 Pulse takes a data-driven dive into the week that was at the U.S. Supreme Court.

  • Calif. May Allow Judges To Work Remotely In Civil Matters

    California's Judicial Council next week will consider amending court rules to allow judges to preside remotely over civil proceedings from a location other than a courtroom.

  • iStock-501228716.jpg

    Ga. Dept. Of Law, Ex-Paralegal Settle Race Discrimination Suit

    A Georgia federal judge has closed a former paralegal's discrimination and retaliation case against the Georgia Department of Law and a former deputy attorney general now working as a Cobb County Superior Court judge, saying a settlement has been reached. 

  • Fla. Judge Rebuked For Lengthy Case Backlog

    Florida's highest court has publicly reprimanded a state court judge after an investigation revealed he allowed a backlog to develop that stretched back more than two years.

  • 5th Circ. Upholds SEC Proxy Rule On ESG Disclosures

    The Fifth Circuit on Friday threw out a legal challenge to a U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission requirement that will make it easier for investors to identify ESG issues on corporate ballots, saying that suing states like Texas haven't proven that they'll be financially harmed by the measure.

  • Feds Seek 20 Mos. For Ex-Baltimore State's Atty

    Prosecutors asked a Maryland federal court to sentence former state's attorney Marilyn Mosby to 20 months in prison after she was convicted of lying to obtain money from a retirement fund and conning a lender to obtain a vacation home, saying she "could not be trusted to tell the truth" despite her position of public trust.

Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Courts archive.
×

Law360

Law360 Law360 UK Law360 Tax Authority Law360 Employment Authority Law360 Insurance Authority Law360 Real Estate Authority Law360 Healthcare Authority Law360 Bankruptcy Authority

Rankings

Social Impact Leaders Prestige Leaders Pulse Leaderboard Women in Law Report Law360 400 Diversity Snapshot Rising Stars Summer Associates

National Sections

Modern Lawyer Courts Daily Litigation In-House Mid-Law Legal Tech Small Law Insights

Regional Sections

California Pulse Connecticut Pulse DC Pulse Delaware Pulse Florida Pulse Georgia Pulse New Jersey Pulse New York Pulse Pennsylvania Pulse Texas Pulse

Site Menu

Subscribe Advanced Search About Contact